Jacket Image

The Lost Garden Katharine Swartz

ISBN:
9781782641377
Published:
15 May 2015
Format:
Paperback
Dimensions:
352 pages: 130 x 198 mm
Series:
Tales from Goswell

Lonely and stagnating in a soulless job, thirty-seven-year-old Marin Ellis is in need of a new start – but she is not prepared for the one she is given, when, after her estranged father and his second wife die in a car accident, she is made guardian of her fifteen-year-old half-sister Rebecca. The half-sisters are practically strangers, and their life in Hampshire is stilted and strange. At Rebecca’s pleading they move to the picturesque village of Goswell on the Cumbrian coast, settling into the charming Bower House on the edge of church property. When a door to a walled garden captures Rebecca’s interest, Marin becomes determined to open it and discover what is hidden beneath the brambles. She enlists the help of local gardener Joss Fowler, and together they begin to uncover the garden’s surprising secrets. In 1919, nineteen-year-old Eleanor Sanderson, daughter of Goswell’s vicar, is grieving the loss of her beloved brother Walter, killed just days before the Armistice was signed. As winter passes into spring, her mood remains bleak despite her attempts to alleviate the emptiness she feels. When her father decides to hire someone to help Eleanor restore the once beloved, but now neglected, vicarage gardens, she is enchanted by the possibility of a new garden—and the gardener her father hires, Yorkshireman Jack Taylor. Jack understands the nature of Eleanor’s grief more than anyone else seems to, and as they spend time together, a surprising—and unsuitable—friendship unfolds... The Lost Garden is a luminous novel about tragic secrets, the chance for forgiveness, and the healing that can come from a new start.
Katherine Swartz spent her childhood in Canada and then three years as a die hard New Yorker, before living in the Lake District with her husband, an Anglican minister, their five children, and a Golden Retriever. She enjoys such novel things as long country walks and chatting with people in the street, and her children love the freedom of village life – although she often has to ring four or five people to figure out where they’ve gone off to! She writes women’s fiction as well as contemporary romance for Mills & Boon Modern under the name Kate Hewitt, and whatever the genre she enjoys delivering a compelling and intensely emotional story.

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